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  • Memorialization and Commemoration: Teresa Margolles

    Memorialization and Commemoration: Teresa Margolles

    In the exhibition Teresa Margolles: Mundos, on view at the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, Margolles confronts marginalization, exploring the widespread disappearance and death of women in the perilous border city of Ciudad Juárez in the Mexican state of Chihuahua. 

    By Shannon Moore
    Posted March 07, 2017
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  • Earthlings: A Surreal Examination of What It Means to Be Human

    Earthlings: A Surreal Examination of What It Means to Be Human

    The Earthlings exhibition, now on view at Esker Foundation in Calgary, features the work of seven contemporary Canadian artists in a fascinating collaboration between Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists.

    By Tina Reilly
    Posted March 01, 2017
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  • Disposable Art, Process Art, Media Art: Les Levine’s Rule-Breaking Work

    Disposable Art, Process Art, Media Art: Les Levine’s Rule-Breaking Work

    The exhibition Les Levine: Transmedia, on view at Oakville Galleries, brings together a selection of Les Levine’s works from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s. “These were the works by which he first came to acclaim, and they put forward for Toronto a new model of what art could be about, and how it could connect to its time,” said the show’s curator Sarah Robayo Sheridan in an interview with NGC Magazine.

    By Sierra Bellows
    Posted February 01, 2017
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  • Mystical Landscapes: Let the Spiritual Journey Begin

    Mystical Landscapes: Let the Spiritual Journey Begin

    Drawn towards a source of light, inspiration or a divinity, artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Lawren S. Harris, Edvard Munch and Emily Carr immersed themselves in the spiritual, even the mystical. In addition to their outstanding works of art, some of them left behind letters and diaries, books and interviews, offering insight into their transcendental journeys, and focusing on the soul of things, rather than on more material elements.

    By Antonio Aragon
    Posted January 03, 2017
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  • Defending the Crease: The Canadiana of Ken Danby

    Defending the Crease: The Canadiana of Ken Danby

    Beyond the Crease: Ken Danby, on view at the Art Gallery of Hamilton this fall, brings together more than 70 of Danby’s works from private and public collections for the first time, and commemorates the artist nearly a decade after his death.

    By Sierra Bellows
    Posted November 15, 2016
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  • Brenda Francis Pelkey: Photographing Inner Lives

    Brenda Francis Pelkey: Photographing Inner Lives

    Showcasing everything from documentary black-and-white photographs from the mid-1980s to Brenda Francis Pelkey’s current series, SiteBrenda Francis Pelkey: A Retrospective, on view at the Art Gallery of Windsor, features loans from a number of institutions, including the National Gallery of Canada. It is the first retrospective of Pelkey's work, and her first solo exhibition at the AGW since she moved to Windsor.

    By Sierra Bellows
    Posted October 24, 2016
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  • Redesigning the Canadian Identity: The Influence of Scandinavian Style

    Redesigning the Canadian Identity: The Influence of Scandinavian Style

    For anyone who’s ever wrestled with an Allen key and products with unpronounceable names like Grönadal, Äpplarö, and Poäng, Scandinavian design is nothing new. But its influence dates back much farther than the 40 years of everyone’s favourite flat-pack home-furnishings store. In the exhibition True Nordic: How Scandinavia Influenced Design in Canada, the impact of Scandinavian design on everything from furniture, pottery and tableware to textiles and tea cozies is covered in fascinating detail.

    By Stephen Dale
    Posted October 19, 2016
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  • Pierre Bonnard’s Rediscovered Radiance

    Pierre Bonnard’s Rediscovered Radiance

    French painter Pierre Bonnard, who fell out of the spotlight in the decades following his death in 1947, is now in the midst of a well-earned revival. Although Bonnard’s work commanded little attention for roughly four decades after his death, a 1984 exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris sparked new interest in his lyrical, personal portraits of the people, places and objects that inhabited his everyday world. Now, Pierre Bonnard. Radiant Color, an exhibition on view at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, promises to advance the Bonnard mystique and captivate new followers.

    By Stephen Dale
    Posted October 11, 2016
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