• Shelagh Keeley, german notes / after lucretius / de rerum natura (detail), 2013

    An Interview with Shelagh Keeley: On View at The Power Plant

  • George A. Reid, Logging (detail), 1888

    Your Collection at the NGC: George A. Reid

  • Simon Tookoome, Shaman (detail), 1971

    Inuit Fantastic Art: On View at the Winnipeg Art Gallery

  • William Rider-Rider, Smashed Pill-Box, Passchendaele, Belgium (detail), 1917

    The Great War: On View at the NGC

  • Jean McEwen, Untitled (detail), 1966

    Jean McEwen: On View at the Musée des beaux-arts de Sherbrooke

  • Liz Magor, Hudson’s Bay Dou­ble, 2011

    An Interview with Liz Magor

  • William Blair Bruce, The Smiths (detail), 1894

    William Blair Bruce: On View at the Art Gallery of Hamilton

  • S. Chatwood Burton, The Fall (detail), 1918

    Witness: On View at the Canadian War Museum

  • Shelagh Keeley, german notes / after lucretius / de rerum natura (detail), 2013
  • George A. Reid, Logging (detail), 1888
  • Simon Tookoome, Shaman (detail), 1971
  • William Rider-Rider, Smashed Pill-Box, Passchendaele, Belgium (detail), 1917
  • Jean McEwen, Untitled (detail), 1966
  • Liz Magor, Hudson’s Bay Dou­ble, 2011
  • William Blair Bruce, The Smiths (detail), 1894
  • S. Chatwood Burton, The Fall (detail), 1918

Featured

  • Fantastical Objects at the Walter Phillips Gallery

    Fantastical. Whimsical. Mischievous. These are just a few of the words that come to mind when thinking about Be Mysterious, an exhibition on display at the Walter Phillips Gallery at the internationally renowned Banff Centre in Alberta.

  • Rodney Graham in Vancouver

    It seems fitting that three Vancouver galleries joined forces this year to exhibit works by Rodney Graham. One venue would seem almost constraining for an artist who draws upon a multitude of inspirations, and who has been variously described throughout his career as a filmmaker, photographer, sculptor, conceptualist, and even a rock singer.

Latest

  • The Proust Questionnaire: Rita Letendre

    This month, one of Canada’s best-known Abstract Expressionists, Rita Letendre, responds to NGC Magazine's version of The Proust Questionnaire.

  • Aerial Photography in the First World War

    If you were a First World War general poring over aerial photographs of enemy lines, how would you tell the difference between a genuine bomb crater and an artificially created one? The answer is that the artificially created bomb crater would be just a little bit too perfectly round, and would show no traces of an actual explosion. This is one of many questions answered in the fascinating book, The Great War Seen from the Air In Flanders Fields, 1914–1918.

Videos

  • Artist Interview: Vera Frenkel

    In this video, Vera Frenkel discusses her work ... from the Transit Bar (1992, reconstructed in 2014), on view at the National Gallery of Canada until August 17, 2014.

  • Gustave Doré: The Poem of the Vine

    Travel behind the scenes to see how the National Gallery of Canada installed The Poem of the Vine, a bronze sculpture measuring four metres in height and weighing 2.7 tonnes, on loan from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

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